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Lack of foreign $$ continues to affect businesses in 2015 A number of sectors of the business community are saying the unavailability of United States currency continues to affect their operations because less than half of their demands for foreign exchange is being met on a monthly basis. Tweet Latest News NIA pushing for an enhanced tourism product Chamber maintains high expectations on VAT removal Benjai, Kerwin du Bois early headliners for Music Festival Government finds a way to save local CPL matches Acting police commissioner promises tough action in fighting crime Other Stories Grenada police arrest seven Nepalese students arriving from St Lucia Antigua Sailing Week: Under starter's orders RBC Bahamas subsidiary faces allegations of complicity in tax fraud in France West Indies bowlers made to work hard against England on third day of second Test Bank’s AUF gets landslide victory in Anguilla’s general elections
UMIUM — coconuts for Jamaican chocolate spread June Gottgens is adamant on playing her part in revitalising Jamaica's cocoa and coconut industries. Tweet Latest News NIA pushing for an enhanced tourism product Chamber maintains high expectations on VAT removal Benjai, Kerwin du Bois early headliners for Music Festival Government finds a way to save local CPL matches Acting police commissioner promises tough action in fighting crime Other Stories Grenada police arrest seven Nepalese students arriving from St Lucia Antigua Sailing Week: Under starter's orders RBC Bahamas subsidiary faces allegations of complicity in tax fraud in France West Indies bowlers made to work hard against England on third day of second Test Bank’s AUF gets landslide victory in Anguilla’s general elections
UK Government borrowing below forecast Government borrowing fell to £7.4bn in March, figures show, taking the total for the financial year to £87.3bn. Tweet Latest News NIA pushing for an enhanced tourism product Chamber maintains high expectations on VAT removal Benjai, Kerwin du Bois early headliners for Music Festival Government finds a way to save local CPL matches Acting police commissioner promises tough action in fighting crime Other Stories Grenada police arrest seven Nepalese students arriving from St Lucia Antigua Sailing Week: Under starter's orders RBC Bahamas subsidiary faces allegations of complicity in tax fraud in France West Indies bowlers made to work hard against England on third day of second Test Bank’s AUF gets landslide victory in Anguilla’s general elections
CAB looks forward to resolution on correspondent banking relations The Caribbean Association of Banks (CAB) fully supports the Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda, Honourable Gaston. Tweet Latest News NIA pushing for an enhanced tourism product Chamber maintains high expectations on VAT removal Benjai, Kerwin du Bois early headliners for Music Festival Government finds a way to save local CPL matches Acting police commissioner promises tough action in fighting crime Other Stories Grenada police arrest seven Nepalese students arriving from St Lucia Antigua Sailing Week: Under starter's orders RBC Bahamas subsidiary faces allegations of complicity in tax fraud in France West Indies bowlers made to work hard against England on third day of second Test Bank’s AUF gets landslide victory in Anguilla’s general elections
GK set to earn half its revenues overseas THE international expansion of the GraceKennedy (GK) group puts it on an imminent path to earn half of its revenues outside the island with one-third of its staff based overseas. Tweet Latest News NIA pushing for an enhanced tourism product Chamber maintains high expectations on VAT removal Benjai, Kerwin du Bois early headliners for Music Festival Government finds a way to save local CPL matches Acting police commissioner promises tough action in fighting crime Other Stories Grenada police arrest seven Nepalese students arriving from St Lucia Antigua Sailing Week: Under starter's orders RBC Bahamas subsidiary faces allegations of complicity in tax fraud in France West Indies bowlers made to work hard against England on third day of second Test Bank’s AUF gets landslide victory in Anguilla’s general elections
Japan records first trade surplus since 2012 Japan has recorded its first trade surplus in three years after the weaker yen boosted exports and cheaper oil prices lowered its import bill. Tweet Latest News NIA pushing for an enhanced tourism product Chamber maintains high expectations on VAT removal Benjai, Kerwin du Bois early headliners for Music Festival Government finds a way to save local CPL matches Acting police commissioner promises tough action in fighting crime Other Stories Grenada police arrest seven Nepalese students arriving from St Lucia Antigua Sailing Week: Under starter's orders RBC Bahamas subsidiary faces allegations of complicity in tax fraud in France West Indies bowlers made to work hard against England on third day of second Test Bank’s AUF gets landslide victory in Anguilla’s general elections
Grace USA targets US$130m in sales to break even GraceKennedy (Grace) USA will aim for US$130 million (J$14.9 b) in annual sales for its first full year of entry by acquisition into the US. Tweet Latest News NIA pushing for an enhanced tourism product Chamber maintains high expectations on VAT removal Benjai, Kerwin du Bois early headliners for Music Festival Government finds a way to save local CPL matches Acting police commissioner promises tough action in fighting crime Other Stories Grenada police arrest seven Nepalese students arriving from St Lucia Antigua Sailing Week: Under starter's orders RBC Bahamas subsidiary faces allegations of complicity in tax fraud in France West Indies bowlers made to work hard against England on third day of second Test Bank’s AUF gets landslide victory in Anguilla’s general elections
UK tells Russian billionaire Fridman to sell North Sea assets Russian billionaire Mikhail Fridman must sell his North Sea gas fields within six months, the UK has ordered. Tweet Latest News NIA pushing for an enhanced tourism product Chamber maintains high expectations on VAT removal Benjai, Kerwin du Bois early headliners for Music Festival Government finds a way to save local CPL matches Acting police commissioner promises tough action in fighting crime Other Stories Grenada police arrest seven Nepalese students arriving from St Lucia Antigua Sailing Week: Under starter's orders RBC Bahamas subsidiary faces allegations of complicity in tax fraud in France West Indies bowlers made to work hard against England on third day of second Test Bank’s AUF gets landslide victory in Anguilla’s general elections

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Family Net Worth Drops to Level of Early ’90s, Fed Says

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MORTGAGES-CONDEMNATIONWASHINGTON — The recent financial crisis left the median American family in 2010 with no more wealth than they had in the early 1990s, erasing almost two decades of accumulated prosperity, the Federal Reserve said Monday.

The median family, richer than half of the nation’s families and poorer than the other half, had a net worth of $77,300 in 2010, down from $126,400 in 2007, the Fed said. The crash of housing prices explained three-quarters of the loss.

This vast loss of wealth was compounded by a loss of income, as the earnings of the median family fell by 7.7 percent over the same period.

The new data come from the Fed’s much-anticipated release Monday of its triennial Survey of Consumer Finance, one of the broadest and deepest sources of information about the financial health of American families. The latest survey is based on data collected in 2010. Figures are reported in 2010 dollars.

Unsurprisingly, the report is full of grim news, and although it is news from 18 months ago, fresher sources of economic data make clear that most households have since seen only modest increases, at best, in wealth and income.

Despite these setbacks, consumers have continued to spend surprising amounts of money in recent years, helping to keep the economy growing at a modest pace. The survey underscores where the money is coming from: Americans are saving less for future needs and making little progress in repaying debts.

The share of families saving anything over the previous year fell to 52 percent in 2010 from 56.4 percent in 2007. Other government statistics show that total savings have increased since 2007, suggesting that a smaller group of families are saving more money, while a growing number manage to save nothing.

The survey also found a shift in the reasons that families set aside money, illustrating the lack of confidence that is weighing on the pace of economic growth. More families said they were saving as a precautionary measure, to make sure they had sufficient liquidity to meet short-term needs. Fewer said they were saving for retirement, education or for a down payment on a home.

[Related: In Era of Cheap Money, Consumers Are Shut Out]

And the report highlighted the fact that households have made limited progress in reducing the amount that they owe to lenders. The share of households reporting any debt declined by 2.1 percentage points over the last three years, but 74.9 percent of households still owe something and the median amount of the debt did not change.

The drop in reported incomes could have increased the weight of those debts, requiring families to devote a larger share of income to debt payments. But one of the rare benefits of the crisis, lower interest rates, has helped to offset that effect. Families also have been able to reduce debt payments by refinancing into mortgages with longer terms and deferring repayment of student loans.

The survey also confirmed that Americans are shifting the kinds of debts that they carry. The share of families with credit card debt declined by 6.7 percentage points to 39.4 percent, and the median balance of that debt fell 16.1 percent to $2,600.

Families also reduced the number of credit cards that they carried, and 32 percent of families said they now had no cards, up from 27 percent in 2007.

The cumulative statistics concealed large disparities in the impact of the crisis.

The losses of income and wealth fell most heavily on the middle class. Families with incomes in the bottom and top 20 percent of the population sustained smaller losses on a percentage basis than those families in the middle 60 percent.

One reason for this disproportion is that the middle class puts its wealth in housing, and the median amount of home equity dropped to $75,000 in 2010 from $110,000 in 2007. And while other investments have recovered much of the value lost in the depths of the crisis, housing prices have hardly budged.




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